Gavi Alliance – Tanzania

Gavi Alliance – Tanzania

Arete produced multimedia assets in the field to enable the Global Alliance for Vaccination to promote their vaccine work worldwide…

Health worker Sarah Engino immunise a girl with the measles and rubella vaccine in Shambarai village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Sarah Engino immunise a girl with the measles and rubella vaccine in Shambarai village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Sarah Engino immunise a boy with the measles and rubella vaccine in Shambarai village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Sarah Engino prepare to immunise a boy with the measles and rubella vaccine in Shambarai village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Sarah Engino prepare to immunise a boy with the measles and rubella vaccine in Shambarai village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Sarah Engino prepare to immunise a boy with the measles and rubella vaccine in Shambarai village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Sarah Engino prepare to immunise a boy with the measles and rubella vaccine in Shambarai village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

A health worker immunise a boy with the measles and rubella vaccine in Mbuguni village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Children wait to be immunised with the measles and rubella vaccine in Mbuguni village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Children wait to be immunised with the measles and rubella vaccine in Mbuguni village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Monique Michel ( 9 years old ) show a vaccination sign as she wait to receive the measles and rubella vaccine in Mbuguni village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Cervical cancer patient Tabu Kitmonga Kiparu ( 46) in her hospital bed at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 23, Oct 2014.GAVI supports two vaccines specifically benefiting women’s health: HPV vaccines protect against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 which cause cervical cancer.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Cervical cancer patient Tabu Kitmonga Kiparu ( 46) in her hospital bed at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 23, Oct 2014.GAVI supports two vaccines specifically benefiting women’s health: HPV vaccines protect against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 which cause cervical cancer.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Mwajuma Selemani feed her one month old baby cough medicine after she displayed measles like symptoms of a cough and fever at a clinic in Mbuguni village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Mwajuma Selemani feed her one month old baby cough medicine after she displayed measles like symptoms of a cough and fever at a clinic in Mbuguni village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Women wait to be seen by health workers at a clinic in Mbuguni village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Children read a pamphlet about the measles and rubella vaccine in Mbuguni village, Tanzania, 18, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Educationla material promoting the HPV vaccine that women and young girls receive are stored in the Moshi hospital, Tanzania, 19, Oct 2014.GAVI supports two vaccines specifically benefiting women’s health: HPV vaccines protect against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 which cause cervical cancer.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Educationl material promoting the HPV vaccine that women and young girls receive are stored in the Moshi hospital, Tanzania, 19, Oct 2014.GAVI supports two vaccines specifically benefiting women’s health: HPV vaccines protect against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 which cause cervical cancer.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

A girl wait to be immunised with the measles and rubella vaccine in Moshi, Tanzania, 19, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

A health worker prepare to immunise children with the measles and rubella vaccine in Moshi, Tanzania, 19, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Children wait to get immunised with the measles and rubella vaccine in Moshi, Tanzania, 19, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Children wait to get immunised with the measles and rubella vaccine in Moshi, Tanzania, 19, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

A girl gets immunised with the measles and rubella vaccine in Moshi, Tanzania, 19, Oct 2014.Tanzania began today protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health workers prepare the measles and rubella vaccine before heading out to schools to immunise children in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health workers prepare the measles and rubella vaccine before heading out to schools to immunise children in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

A Masai woman transport water by donkey in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health workerLomunyak Ndiyoei wait for his colleagues to catch up as they travel out to schools to immunise children in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Samuel Selestine register children at a small clinic to be immunise in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Samuel Selestine register children at a small clinic to be immunise in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Samuel Selestine and health worker Asia Hassani help to immunise children in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Samuel Selestine register children at a small clinic to be immunise in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Health worker Samuel Selestine register children at a small clinic to be immunise in Losikito district near Arusha, Tanzania, 20, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

David Lulu check the battery system from the solar fridge at the Endulen hospital in the Ngorongoro district, Tanzania, 21, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

Masai women wait at the maternity ward at the Endulen hospital in the Ngorongoro district, Tanzania, 21, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

David Lulu check the battery system from the solar fridge at the Endulen hospital in the Ngorongoro district, Tanzania, 21, Oct 2014.Tanzania began protecting 21 million children against measles and rubella as part of a nationwide immunisation campaign supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.All children aged between nine months and 14 years old will be able to receive the vaccine through an initial catch up campaign taking place over the next seven days. Once the campaign has been completed Tanzania will transition away from using a single-antigen measles vaccine in its routine programme and replace it with the combined measles-rubella vaccine.PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO/GAVI

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We sent our highly experienced news photographer Karel Prinsloo on a seven-day trip to three locations in Tanzania to gather photographs and film for Gavi, the global vaccine alliance.


Our photographs were used by several journalists to illustrate their stories about the new vaccine and our images were used by Gavi in all of their stories and publicity.


We produced photographs, case studies, a slideshow and a film about the project on behalf of Gavi. Our work told incredible stories about the roll out of a new vaccine for teenage girls that would prevent them from getting cervical cancer. The vaccines were being rolled out with the support of the ministry of health in secondary schools throughout Tanzania.


Our photographs were used by Gavi to produce an exhibition in Germany which highlighted the launch of the new vaccine and told inspiring stories from the project.


Our photographs were sent as press hand-outs to the wire services and they were used extensively by the German media.


Gavi was able to use our impactful images to tell the story of their launch of the HPV vaccine in Tanzania and celebrate the incredible achievements of their project.

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