GSMA – Mali & Côte d’Ivoire

Mali & Côte d’Ivoire – GSMA

Arete worked with GSMA to highlight the impact and effects of mobile money on women in Mali and Côte d’Ivoire. We produced an animated video to illustrate the findings of a recent report and produced a film and in Côte d’Ivoire to show how women’s lives have been transformed by mobile money.

Yvette NÕGuessan Amani, 60, who has been selling attieke, a popular food made from cassava, in the village of Kodimasso, Côte d’Ivoire for 27 years, poses in front of her house on August 23, 2017. Her business has grown in recent years, which she attributes to her use of Orange Money. By accepting payment through her account, she avoids dealing exclusively in cash and is therefore able to save more. ÒItÕs like a hole you can hide money in,Ó she says. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Yvette N'Guessan Amani, 60, uses Orange Money on her mobile phone on August 23, 2017 in Kodimasso, Côte d’Ivoire. Orange Money can be used on any type of phone from anywhere, even in remote villages. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Elyse Kouassi Affoue, 45, uses mobile money at her home in Kodimasso, Côte d’Ivoire on August 24, 2017. Elyse uses her Orange Money account to transfer, receive and deposit money securely without having to travel 10 km from her home to the nearest town. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Elyse Kouassi Affoue, 45, prepares fish in Kodimasso, Côte d’Ivoire on August 24, 2017. The mother of three sells smoked fish and uses her Orange Money account to deposit the proceeds. "I see it as a bank," she says. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Elyse Kouassi Affoue, 45, uses her phone while her neighbors prepare lunch in Kodimasso, Côte d’Ivoire on August 24, 2017. The village is remote and she uses her phone to stay connected. Orange Money allows her to send and receive money between friends and family throughout the country. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Cristelle Mame Edisse, 31, and a mother of three, poses in her tailor shop in Kodimasso, Côte d’Ivoire on August 24, 2017. ThereÕs not much business in the village so she appreciates that Orange Money does not charge fees for transfers between accounts. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Alice Brou Logbochi, 38, a pig farmer and a mother of one poses at her home in Kodimasso, Côte d’Ivoire on August 24, 2017. Alice uses her Orange Money account as a bank to safely store her income after selling a pig. "Otherwise," she said, "villagers have to put their money under their mattress". In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020.

Accounting student, Josiane Kouassi Adja Same, 21, poses for a photo in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire on August 22, 2017. Josiane uses Orange money to make quick, secure money transfers, and likes that it also gives her bonus airtime for buying phone credit through her account. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Josiane Kouassi Adja Same, 21, demonstrates how quick and easy it is to send money via Orange Money, in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire on August 22, 2017. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Josiane Kouassi Adja Same, 21, leaves her home in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire on August 22, 2017. The accounting student is constantly on her phone, so Orange Money is an easy way for her to send and receive money, and even pay her school fees. In 2017 OrangeCôte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Josiane Kouassi Adja Same, 21, withdraws money from her Orange Money account at a kiosk near her home in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire on August 22, 2017. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Nadege Zozo, 25, withdraws money from her Orange Money account at a kiosk near her home in Grand Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire on August 22, 2017. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Katy N'Jie, 20, hangs bathing suits at her mother's stall in Grand Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire on August 22, 2017. She says that if it were up to her, she would only sell their merchandise online. Through her Orange Money account, she can buy an Internet pass, post photos on social media through the Orange network, arrange delivery, and accept electronic payment - all from home.

Katy N'Jie, 20, who owns a clothing retail business, sends a transfer via Orange money on August 22, 2017, in Côte d’Ivoire. Most women in Côte d’Ivoire use Orange Money to transfer money to friends and family, but some also use it to buy and sell products for their businesses. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Katy N'Jie, 20, hangs bathing suits at her mother's stall in Grand Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire on August 22, 2017. She says that if it were up to her, she would only sell their merchandise online. Through her Orange Money account, she can buy an Internet pass, post photos on social media through the Orange network, arrange delivery, and accept electronic payment - all from home. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Katy N'Jie, 20, poses for a photograph in front of her stall selling bathing suits she runs with her mother in the beach town of Grand Bassam, just outside of Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, on August 24, 2017/ Katy is also an accounting student, and has been able to grow her mother's business by posting pictures of their merchandise on social media and accepting payment via Orange Money. In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

Katy N'Jie, 20, waits for customers with her mother at their bathing suit stall in Grand Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire on August 24, 2017. As a young, tech-savvy accounting student, Katy manages her mother's Orange Money account to buy merchandise and accept payment for online orders through social media."[At the market] it's only occasional," she says. "[On my phone] it's all the time." In 2017 Orange Côte d’Ivoire committed to reduce the gender gap in their mobile money customer base by 2020. Photo: Nick Loomis / Arete / GSMA

 

Arete’s video team was recently commissioned by The GSM Association (GSMA) to highlight the impacts of mobile money on women’s lives in Mali and Côte d’Ivoire. The GSMA Mobile Money Programme’s mission is to increase the utility and sustainability of mobile money services and increase financial inclusion. They are working with mobile operators and industry stakeholders to create a robust mobile money ecosystem.

 

Arete’s designer, James Isgrove, produced a striking animation, scripted by Jessica Monson, to illustrate the findings of a recent GSMA report “Mapping the mobile money gender gap: Insights from Côte d’Ivoire and Mali”.

 

Videographer Nick Loomis travelled to Côte d’Ivoire to meet some of the women whose lives have been transformed by Orange money. Nick’s film shows that mobile money can offer the opportunity for financial inclusion and independence for women across the world be they rural or urban, old or young.

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